Tag Archives: CPR

CPR in 3 Simple Steps

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Sudden cardiac arrest occurs when the heart suddenly stops beating and the victim loses consciousness and collapses. It isn’t always caused by a heart attack. Nationally, if a victim of sudden cardiac arrest collapses outside of a hospital, his/her chances of survival if a bystander does not start CPR immediately is less than 8%. You can double or triple a loved one’s chances of survival by starting CPR.

These are 3 simple steps to save a life if you see a teen or adult who has collapsed:

  1. Check to see if they are responsive and breathing normally. The best way to determine if someone is unresponsive and may need CPR is to tap the victim and shout “Are you OK?” while checking to see if they are breathing normally. Breathing normally does NOT include snoring, gurgling, or gasping.A victim must be on his/her back on a hard flat surface, preferably on the floor, for CPR to be effective.
  2. Call 911.
  3. Compress hard and fast on the center of the chest.Interlock fingers and place palm of one hand over the center of the victim’s chest.Keeping arms straight and elbows locked, push straight down hard – at least 2 inches. It is better to push too deep than not deep enough.The hands should not come off the chest or “bounce” between each compression, but downward pressure should be completely released to allow the heart to refill with blood.Push hard and fast in the center of the chest (about 100 times per minute) when doing compressions on an unresponsive victim who is not breathing, or not breathing normally once 911 has been called. Do not stop until help arrives, unless the victim begins moving or speaking.

Stop by our booth at the North Carolina State Fair October 12- 22, 2017, and we can teach you how to save a life!


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Education Building (near Gate 12)
1025 Blue Ridge Road, Raleigh, NC 27607

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Dispelling 5 Myths of Learning CPR

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North Carolina Heart & Vascular and UNC REX Healthcare are sponsoring a booth at the North Carolina State Fair this year to offer free CPR training. Over 130 instructors will come together to volunteer more than 500 hours and train as many people as possible.

It’s easy, quick and can help you save a life, but every year we find people reluctant to stop and get trained. We asked why, and here are our Top 5 CPR Training Myths dispelled. If you think of any other reasons you may be reluctant to stop by, reply and let us know.

  1. Myth: I will look silly

    Fact: Everyone at our booth will be doing the same thing, so even if it does look silly, you won’t be the only one. If you are, our instructors will do the compressions with you, so you’re not alone.

  2. Myth: I will have to do mouth to mouth breathing on a dummy.

    Fact: We teach “Hands-Only” CPR, which is just chest compressions, not mouth to mouth breathing.

  3. Myth: Hands-only CPR is ineffective, so why learn it?

    Fact: By simply recognizing cardiac arrest, calling 9-1-1 and starting chest compressions, a loved one’s odds of survival can be doubled or even tripled.

  4. Myth: It will take too much time

    Fact: In about the same amount of time it takes to spin our prize wheel and get your prize, you can learn CPR. It takes 2 – 3 minutes to learn, and it’s time well spent.

  5. Myth: It will be difficult.

    Fact: Our great instructors take you through everything step by step, and show you just how easy it can be. Check out the simple CPR steps before you stop by.

Stop by and see us in the Education Building, booth 37-38, this week at the Fair. Spin the prize wheel, and find out how quick and easy it can be to learn how to save a life!

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What you need to know about AEDs

Post Glenn W. Barham, EMT-P and Coordinator for the Emergency Response Team at Rex Healthcare.

032714_AED1Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are literal lifesavers, delivering a shock to restore a heart’s normal rhythm following sudden cardiac arrest. But would you know how to use one in an emergency situation?

AEDs are available in many public places, including malls, grocery stores and airports, and are actually very user-friendly. While there are several AED brands on the market, they all work similarly.  The first thing to do is turn it on, and then just follow the voice and visual prompts.  They are designed to be used by untrained lay people.

Here are some pointers, courtesy of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, to keep in mind if you ever find yourself in an emergency situation requiring an AED:

  • 032714_AED2Before using an AED, check the person to make sure there is no response (shout at or shake him or her; if the person is a child, pinch instead).
  • Call 911; if more than one person is present, have one person call emergency services and get the AED while the other person begins CPR.
  • Check the breathing and pulse. If breathing and pulse are irregular or not present, get ready to use the AED as soon as possible.
  • Turn on the defibrillator, which will give you step-by-step instructions via voice and screen prompts.
  • 032714_AED3Make sure the wires from the electrodes are connected to the AED, and that no one is touching the person, then press the “analyze” button, which will allow the machine to check the person’s heart rhythm.
  • If the machine tells you a shock is needed, stand clear of the person before pressing the “shock” button.
  • Start or resume CPR until help arrives or the person begins moving. Stay with the person.

The residents of Raleigh and Wake County enjoy one of the best out-of-hospital cardiac arrest resuscitation rates in the country. Early CPR and defibrillation are cornerstones of that success. Every Emergency Response Team that works an event in our community is equipped with an AED, and their use has been instrumental, along with rapid CPR, in several successful resuscitations. While we don’t have to use them often, we realize they are one of the most vital pieces of equipment we have.

I encourage everyone to take a CPR class which includes the AED training. Do it for your family, your friends, and your neighbors.

If your company,  church, or other facility outside of Rex has an AED, please make sure that the local 911 center is aware. In cases of emergency, they can instruct the caller on its location. If you have a heart condition that puts you at risk for sudden cardiac arrest, talk with your health care provider about purchasing one for home use.

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